International Concourse in the Arts of Self Defence (1902)

A pictorial report on a Bartitsu Club exhibition from Caras y caretas (1902)

The Spanish text reads:

International Concourse in the Arts of Self Defence

On the 23rd of November was held in the School of Arms in London an interesting tournament and demonstration of the various self defence methods that have been adapted into the “Bartitsu” system which has, as with many other Japanese trends, been adopted easily in Europe.

The Japanese champions were there along with wrestlers and boxers from Britain and from the European continent. Part of what one might describe as a match of over-riding interest was an encounter between a professional wrestler who represented the Cornish and Devonshire style and a champion of Osaka (Japan) named Uyenishi. The Japanese wrestler won each of the three rounds of this contest.

A professional boxer contended against the school’s champion of the French savate, and the result was indecisive. Several of the competitors explained aspects of the Bartitsu system, and through their exhibitions much interest was sown in the employment of the walking stick as a defensive weapon.

Our pictures reproduce the main scenes of this interesting tournament in which, overall, the Japanese dominated, and if partially, in some of the European exercises, failed, they were not truly defeated since with the methods of their own country they were victorious against all attempts to dominate them.

A Bartitsu display from 1901

A report on a Bartitsu demonstration at E.W. Barton-Wright’s Academy of Arms and Physical Culture, from the Illustrated London News, November 30, 1901.

The Art of Self Defence

The various methods of self defence adopted by followers of the “Bartitsu” system were demonstrated at their School of Arms on Nov. 23, when they were opposed by English and Continental wrestlers and boxers. Great interest was aroused by the contest between a professional wrestler in the Cornish and Devonshire style and Uyenishi, champion light-weight wrestler of Osaka. The Japanese won each of the three throws. A professional boxer defended himself against the school’s “savate”, with an indecisive result.

The Bartitsu method of wrestling was illustrated and demonstrations were given of the use of a walking stick as a defensive weapon. Four members of the audience were then invited to attempt to strangle one of the two Japanese by means of a rod placed across his throat. Needless to say, their efforts were unavailing.