Sadakazu Uyenishi in action

jumovie

This animated GIF was created by John Lindsey of the e-budo forum. It is an animation of movie frames originally used as photographic illustrations in Sadakazu Uyenishi’s 1905 “Textbook of Ju-jutsu”. Uyenishi and his colleague Yukio Tani were jujitsu instructors at E.W. Barton-Wright’s Bartitsu Club between 1900-1902.

Although originally published as a series of photographic images, these 24 frames were shot as film footage and probably represent some of the earliest motion picture footage of jujitsu.

Not your grandfather’s Sherlock Holmes …

Sherlock Holmes movie trailer

The first official trailer for the upcoming Holmes movie, evidently calculated to outrage purists and attract the attention of a younger audience.

Holmes’ “baritsu” is not identical to E.W. Barton-Wright’s Bartitsu, but still, the trailer shows us bare-knuckle boxing, stick fighting, a jiujitsu-like throw and a savate-like kick.  By establishing the equation of “Victorian London” and “martial arts”, the new movie risks making Bartitsu cool ..

“Adventures of Sherlock Holmes” fight scenes

As an experienced boxer, stick fighter and expert in “baritsu”, Sherlock Holmes came close to E.W. Barton-Wright’s ideal of Bartitsu.  Click on the text links below to watch some fight sequences from the classic 1984 – 1994 Granada Television series, starring Jeremy Brett as Holmes.

Holmes attempts to fend off two attackers with his cane

Holmes demonstrates the gentlemanly art of fisticuffs

Holmes employs “baritsu” to defeat Professor Moriarty

Basic Bartitsu demo. at ISMAC ’07

This footage was recorded at the International Swordfighting and Martial Arts Conference in Michigan, USA, between July 12-15, 2007.  It features a series of mostly canonical Bartitsu unarmed combat and cane demonstrations by myself, with Kirk Lawson assisting.

The theme of the seminar was to use a small selection of canonical and some neo-Bartitsu techniques and sequences to explore two major principles:

1) alignment control, or using your own weight and skeletal structure to disrupt the opponent’s balance and 2) initiative control, either by inviting a particular attack or by executing a pre-emptive attack to control the opponent’s options and movement.

Thus, we were primarily using these sequences as academic examples of certain technical and tactical options, rather than as self defence or competition sequences per se.

The defence between 00.56 and 01.00 is a neo-Bartitsu improvisation combining a number of techniques (palm-heels, a trachea grab, low stamping kick etc.) to reinforce the theme of controlling the opponent’s balance and skeletal alignment.

Thanks to Bartitsu Society member Chris Amendola for editing the footage.


Bartitsu Promotional Clip from Chris Amendola on Vimeo.

Self Defence For Discerning Ladies and Gentlemen

Last summer I taught at an ‘experience day’ held by The Grange, near Birmingham in the UK. They videoed the event and put up a short clip on youtube.

Whilst this was just a taster day for those new to martial arts and bartitsu in particular, as well as being somewhat tongue-in-cheek it does show some basic elements of Bartitsu and it’s contemporary antagonistic arts.

By contrast here is a link to Craig Gemeiner’s excellent Vigny La Canne video, also on youtube.