Weapons of the Suffragette Bodyguards

suffragette weapons

A collection of Suffragette bodyguard weapons and tools confiscated by police following the infamous “Battle of Glasgow” brawl, which took place at St. Andrew’s Hall on the evening of March 9th, 1914.

This picture was originally published in the Daily Record and now forms part of a display at theĀ Glasgow People’s Palace museum.

The collection includes include six Indian clubs and five police truncheons (also commonly carried by private citizens for self defence purposes) along with several specialised items:

* top row, third from left: a set of wirecutters

* top row, fifth from left: a “life-preserver” or semi-flexible, weighted bludgeon

* bottom row, third from left: a section of barbed wire, probably part of the barricade that was concealed around the edge of the St. Andrew’s Hall stage; a pistol, probably that which was loaded with blanks and fired to intimidate the police by Scottish suffragette Janie Allen.

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2 thoughts on “Weapons of the Suffragette Bodyguards”

  1. Feminism always had the good and the bad, yet no one realizes this. I’m glad this movie actually shows the reality that these women had to face so white women can have their rights that they felt they needed. I hate to say it though, feminism was a middle class, white women’s club because they screamed the loudest for their problems, screw the lower classes and minority women that wanted their rights as well.

  2. A number of the major players in the WSPU were women of the working classes – Flora Drummond, Annie Kenney, Edith Garrud and ohers – and the movement had very significant working class support despite the arguable snobbery of Emmeline and Christabel Pankhurst as individuals. The only woman of colour known to have been closely associated with the English suffrage cause was Princess Sophia Duleep Singh, but that has to be contextualised within the general racial homogeneity of English society during the very early 20th century.

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